Why is one of my computers not getting an internet connection from my network while all others do?

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I have a home network with a good number of devices (phones, game consoles, laptops, tablets). Recently my primary Windows desktop system stopped getting an internet connection, however all my other systems, 3 Macs and 1 Windows laptop all get internet just fine.

I'm running an Apple Airport Extreme 802.11n

I have a home network with a good number of devices (phones, game consoles, laptops, tablets). Recently my primary Windows desktop system stopped getting an internet connection, however all my other systems, 3 Macs and 1 Windows laptop all get internet just fine.

I'm running an Apple Airport Extreme 802.11n Dual Band router. I don't remember changing any settings on the router, and the computer in question did work before.

This computer is out of reliable range of the wi-fi signal, so I have a powerline adapter set up with one side going into the router and the other going into the computer. This set up has worked in the past currently works with my Mac laptop, but as soon as I plug it into the Windows desktop, it refuses to connect to the internet. When I do get it to connect via wi-fi, it's the same problem, no internet.

I have a Windows 10 laptop that works just fine on the network right now. So it's not a matter of Windows computer not working with an Apple router.

Actually, I don't think it's the network, I connected to my phone via hotspot and the internet still wouldn't work on this computer. Still said no IP address/No Internet Access.

I have no clue what happened, I don't use the computer on a daily basis, I just turned it on one day and the internet didn't work anymore. Not sure if maybe a Windows 10 update did something.

I'm attaching a screenshot of what it says when I run "ipconfig /all".

Other answer:

Jeff S:
I assume the your router is on address 10.0.1.1 (from the screen shot).

First check whether the IPv4 DNS server is being set up by DHCP or is manually configured. If it is set for automatic set-up, which I hope it is, then I suspect you are right about the Windows 10 update that happened about a week ago. It looks as though DHCP is no longer getting all the information correctly.

If you have System Restore enabled and there is a restore point that is a couple of weeks old, try restoring it. For some reason Windows 10 defaults to having System Restore disabled. When you do a restore it will create another restore point so you can roll forward again.

The alternatives are:

1) Uninstalling the latest Windows 10 update (enable System Restore and create a restore point before you do this as it will be the easiest way of rolling forward again).

2) Find an unused local IP address (probably starting 10.0.1…) that is in the same subnet as the router but is outside the DHCP address range that the router is using, then assign that as the TCP/IPv4 address of the computer. Set the subnet mask to be the same as other computers have got. I suspect it will be 255.255.255.0 although it might suggest a different mask when you change to a fixed address – get the subnet mask from the laptop. Set the gateway and DNS server addresses to the address of the router (from the screen shot this might be 10.0.1.1) – again get the gateway and DNS addresses from the laptop. Apart from the actual IP address, the other TCP/IPv4 settings should be the same as the laptop's.

Since the computer sounds like a desktop machine, there should be no problem using static addresses as it is probably unlikely that you will move it to a different network.

I hope this helps.

spec9102k2:
If neither the wifi nor the power line works then it isn't an adapter issue. I have two theories. 1. Router has run out of IP addresses. turn off all connected devices reboot router only turn on primary computer and see if it connects. b) Spyware or virus has infected your system and is blocking your connection. run full anti virus and anti spyware scans and uninstall any software or updates that occurred on or about the time the computer quit connecting to the internet. Temporarily disable windows firewall and make sure internet explorer settings in control panel are set correctly. Try connecting to internet.

If that doesn't work take I to your local shop.

Tracy L:
Simple answer, your computer is NOT getting a DHCP address from the router. The IPv4 shown is a 169,x,x,x address when the system appears to use 10.0.1.x address scheme. If it were mine, I would change the settings from DHCP to Manually assigned use say 10.0.1.199 or 10.0.1.159 etc (be sure it is outside the DHCP settings of the router) and see if you connect. If you can connect with an assigned address you have two choices. Use a "static"/assigned address or switch back to DHCP to see if it will now pull and address. DHCP has failures with SOME machines and SOME OS systems and some updates cause the issue. Reloading the network card drivers may help the issue.
Palladini:
if you have multiple computers, why are they not hooked together at the router via cable? Faster Internet speeds, always up.
Jessica:
you have bad connection to computer
michael:
you have bad connection to computer
Brian Sanders:
Bad connection in one of the jack plugs or ethernet cord?
Starrysky:
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/libr… tells how to solve problem with ipconfig.

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