Why aren't my internet speeds as advertised?

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My current internet plan is 50 Mbps. When I have a direct plug in with a Ethernet cord I'm getting all the way up to 63 Mbps. I have a 2 in 1 router/ modem, I was getting around 2 Mbps on the Wifi. I bought a brand new Asus AC-1750 3rd gen router yesterday. Now I'm getting around 25-30 Mbps over wifi. Why

My current internet plan is 50 Mbps. When I have a direct plug in with a Ethernet cord I'm getting all the way up to 63 Mbps. I have a 2 in 1 router/ modem, I was getting around 2 Mbps on the Wifi. I bought a brand new Asus AC-1750 3rd gen router yesterday. Now I'm getting around 25-30 Mbps over wifi. Why is it only pushing half of the plan when my modem can handle 300 Mbps and the router all the way up to 1750?

Other answer:

Hawks:
Since you have combined router (with integrated modem), you can probably log on to the router and check out the raw broadband speed that the modem section of the router is actually connected at to the ISP. For example, my ISP advertises 38 Mbps, but the raw download speed I am actually getting today is 39.02 Mbps.

Your ISP will aim to deliver 50 Mbps to you if our connection from your home to the ISP's terminal is fairly short and the line is in good condition.

The 50 Mbps is the speed over the ISP link. If, for example, you connect using Ethernet to a computer that has a port that supports only 10 Mbps, then that lower speed is the maximum that computer will achieve.

WiFi can be more problematic regarding the speeds it can achieve. First of all, a WiFi connection depends on the actual WiFi standard that the router and the computer's network adapter have selected.

A more significant factor is the compatibility between router and the wireless adapter. From my own experiences with my computers and routers, and those of my friends, between 2% and 5% of router/network adapter combinations have some form of compatibility issue. This can range from a computer not even detecting that the specific network is there to the connection being much slower than expected. This can affect one device, while a different device works quite normally.

Interference from other networks can also cause issues which may affect some devices but not others.

Although WiFi is a half duplex interface, while Ethernet is full duplex, with speed tests from sites such as the Ookla test:

http://www.speedtest.net

because the download transfers very large blocks in one direction and very small acknowledgement packets in the opposite direction, the fact that WiFi is half duplex does not make much of an impact on the actual speed of the speed text. It is also possible that the test acknowledges multiple packets with a single acknowledgement packet. For example, my WiFi connection is currently running at 65 Mbps to a wireless access point about 7 metres away. The Ookla test is giving me a download speed of 36.15 Mbps, which is around 93% of the raw broadband speed, and over 95% of the speed my ISP advertises.

Changing your router probably eliminated some of the compatibility issues that gave you such a low WiFi speed originally. With the Asus router, you could probably expect a download speed approaching 50 Mbps. If you can, check what raw WiFi speed you are getting on the connection to the router. You should be able to see this figure from the WiFi status window in Network and Sharing Center in modern versions of Windows.

On my desktop PC, which has both Ethernet and WiFi, the speed measurements are within 5% of each other and close to the ISP figure for my actual broadband connection.

You need to do some investigations to find where the bottleneck is occurring.

Kevy:
Yes your absolutely right…

On wired your getting 13 Mbps more than your plan is allowed… How is even Possible.

Wired – Sends and Receives Transmissions at the same time. FULL DUPLEX
WiFi – Transmits a Send… or Receives a transmission.. but not at same time… HALF DUPLEX

So if Wired will get Actual Speeds of Transmission

Wifi Will produce half of what Wired can Achieve but is also dealing with interference and a lot of drop packets which needs to be retransmitted.

?:
Wifi will NEVER be as fast as a wired connection unless BOTH devices can deliver 300 Mbps. Your machine obviously does not have that capability.
Duncan:
There are, at least, one hundred and one variables that may affect the speed you see.

How are you measuring your speed? Which device you using to mature the speed? Where are you in relation to the router when you measure the speed? What else is connected to the network when you measure the speed? Etc.

chrisjbsc:
Where is the bottle neck? Your wifi? your router? your devices? or the Internet access? Your plan of 50mbps is NOT a "this is what you will get", but a "you will get up to this speed".

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