What programming language to start with?

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I asked a question before sorta about this but I am just now getting into coding and wanna know where to start. I have no prior knowledge for computer science other than the things I've picked up on while using the computer all my life up to 16. People say Python is better for hacking and things alike and

I asked a question before sorta about this but I am just now getting into coding and wanna know where to start. I have no prior knowledge for computer science other than the things I've picked up on while using the computer all my life up to 16. People say Python is better for hacking and things alike and others say C++ and Java are the top for game dev. I wanna be a game designer/dev. when I get older and right now I have a book by Mike McGrath on Java and was wondering which language to start off with first since C++ will be a challenge and Java is very similar from what I hear to it. Help please.

Other answer:

Jacob:
Since you have no prior knowledge in computer science other than the things you've picked up on while using the computer all your life up to 16 you might have heard some.people say Python is better for hacking and things alike and others say C++ and Java are the top for game dev. Since you want to be a game designer/dev. when you get older you should realize that you are already older than you were when you posted your question. But right now, because you have that book by Mike McGrath on Java and are wondering which language to start off with first since C++ will be a challenge and Java is very similar from what you've heard then the best thing you can do is flip a coin.
Chris:
Python. It's easy to learn and will teach you all the basic concepts. Once you have those under your belt, you can switch to another language.

Learning how to program and learning how to use a particular language are two very different things; the former is like chess, and the latter is much easier. However with your first language, you have to do both at the same time, so pick an easy one. Python.

cpcii:
Read this really well written article to find out what language you should learn:

https://medium.freecodecamp.com/what-pro…

It will give you a basic understanding of any language. Once you get good with that language you can easily pick up other languages.

Don't focus on ONE language, learn programming and algorithms in general and then you only have to pick up the grammar of a language to do a project.

I program in about 4 languages with little help and can start new ones pretty easy because I understand how to program and just have to learn how to do it in different languages to do at different times that is what you should learn.

Rasputin:
I have been a developer for over 20 years. I have never learned Python. I do not even know what python looks like. The script names end in .py, right? I have used them, but never opened one with an editor, to look at the text.

I only ever used assembly, C, then C++.

Python might be good for learning.

Learn everything about Linux/UNIX and shell scripting, and command line.

Some things you need to know, that non-professionals will not tell you

UNIX/Linux have been with us since the early 70's and they are here to stay. Linux is just now catching on with regards to the desktop. Windows is slowly evolving toward Linux "under the hood" so to speak. You cannot afford not to learn Linux unless you plan to live with your parents when you are 40.

Java is the core of Android app development. Expect it to stay.

Know several text editors. That means being proficient with Notepad++, as well as vi. Codeblocks, Eclypse, Emecs, and others.

Your local variables start with small letters, your imported varables are capitol, your module level variables start with m_, your global variables start with g_, and so on. The variable type should be given in the name for all variables that are not local.

Call yourself a "software designer" or "application designer", and nobody will call you for an interview. Titles containing the word "designer" are fun in collage, but are quickly dropped if you want a job.

Game Designer? You are kidding, right? If 10% of graduate with a degree in "Game Design" are not bussing tables, I will be surprised.

About interviews, and lying:

I have interviewed dozens of C developer candidates that claim to understand C++. Not a single one can answer even the most basic questions about C++. Do not claim you know stuff you know nothing about.

"I used UBUNTU once" does not make you a Linux guru. Learn Linux for real before you make claims on your resume. If you do not know what gcc, g++ are, or what "rwx" means, do not claim to have any knowladge of Linux.

The ability to sync your iPod with a macbook does not make you an IT expert. My auntie never saw a computer until she was 65. She can use a macbook. Do not inflate your computer skills.

I took classes in VisualBasic.net, and C#. I got "A"'s in the classes. Every professional knows that getting an 'A' in a class and being any good at something are two very different things. I do not list VisualBasic, or C# on my resume.

Likewise, I know nothing about Python, so I do not claim it on my resume.

If you have taken the course, than completed projects on your own, or for hire, then you can put it on your resume. If you are only "book learned" with no experience outside the classroom do not waste my time. If you think you are good, the show me, and cut the lip service.

Not one person has ever brought a lighwieght notebook with him to an interview and showed me his work. Why not?

AAAJ:
C language
Will C:
Start with visual basic
VITTORIO:
Hmm! "C"

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