Laptop on its own decides to drop wi-fi connection.?

Home » Computer Networking » Laptop on its own decides to drop wi-fi connection.?
Computer Networking No Comments

It is not disabling wi-fi, so it has nothing to do with powersettings.
Tho it only happens in one of the house rooms. Can it be caused by network overlapping? Because I see another simmialar Wi-Fi name in the notworks list. Mine beeing TNCAPD46584 and another TNCAPD15489.
But isnt setting up a static IP a pain in

It is not disabling wi-fi, so it has nothing to do with powersettings.
Tho it only happens in one of the house rooms. Can it be caused by network overlapping? Because I see another simmialar Wi-Fi name in the notworks list. Mine beeing TNCAPD46584 and another TNCAPD15489.
But isnt setting up a static IP a pain in the ****?

Best Answer:

Blue: Having two similar network names is irrelevant. Also, static versus dynamic IP addresses is irrelevant unless there is an actual clash of addresses on the same network. This is normally reported as a duplicate IP, and would not be specific to a particular room.

WiFi networks can use nominal 20, 40 or 80 MHz of bandwidth, although almost invariably by default the 20 MHz bandwidth will be used. Since WiFi channels are 5 MHz apart, this means any other network that is less than 4 channels away from the channel you are using will overlap and can cause interference. (If you are using the very old 802.11b standard, then this increases from 4 to 5 channel separation as this old standard uses slightly more bandwidth.) In most countries, on 2.4 GHz, the non-overlapping channels are 1, 5, 9 and 13. (In the USA, channels 12 and 13 are not available so channels 1, 6 and 11 are normally quoted.) If you are using 802.11b, then channels 1 and 13 are the best to use so as not to cause problems on channels 5 and 9. (In the USA 802.11b can still use 1, 6 or 11.) On the 5 GHz band, the channels are normally specified every fourth channel so overlapping does not occur. (802.11b is not available on 5 GHz.)

A few wireless devices have compatibility issues with certain routers. In some cases this is affected by other nearby networks. This could explain why your laptop has a problem in only one room as the conflicting signal may be more intrusive there. Log on to your router and try different wireless channels to see if other channels clear this problem.

I hope this helps.

Other answer:

Blue:
Certainly interference can be the issue if your problem only occurs in one location. It has NOTHING to do with a static or DHCP address though! If two radio signals collide.. sometimes they just are not usable thus your connection drops. It could even be that the area you are attempting to use the computer gets too weak of connection for wifi to work. WiFi is microwave radio… it means it is line of sight! Put too many obstacles in the way and the signal won't work. You can try different channels, see if there is one that works better than the one you are using. You can set the channel by changing it inside the router. Try some others see if it works better.
cdjp84:
static ip is very fast and very easy to do, but the simple sollution is just change your network name
Angel Rasha:
IDK

LEAVE A COMMENT