Is opening a computer and adding a 2nd hard drive more complicated than it looks?

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Let's say my mainboard has SATA 3 ports and I wanted to add a 2nd hard drive that also has the Sata 3 interface, but is it much more complicated than simply attaching another SATA cable on the HDD to mainboard and then power to the hard drive from the PSU?

Is there something else I'm missing? I have a

Let's say my mainboard has SATA 3 ports and I wanted to add a 2nd hard drive that also has the Sata 3 interface, but is it much more complicated than simply attaching another SATA cable on the HDD to mainboard and then power to the hard drive from the PSU?

Is there something else I'm missing? I have a huge interest in computers and know some things about them but that in no way means I am a computer enthusiast. However, I do know that the chipset on the mainboard will dictate how much RAM and type of RAM it can detect, maximum clockspeed from the processor in its socket and the types of GPU card that can be attached to it.

Other answer:

Yousuf Khan:
The hardware insertion part is as dead simple as you think, just attach the data and power cables and you're done!

The harder part usually comes afterwards, when it's time to make use of the drives in the OS of your choice. Each OS has a slightly different procedure, whether you're talking Windows, Linux, or Mac OSX. For example, I'll list the steps necessary to make use of a drive in Windows:

(1) Get the hardware recognized under the OS. Sometimes this will happen automatically as soon as you reboot the computer, and the OS will detect the new drive, but sometimes this doesn't happen, and you may have to run a manual hardware detection.

(2) The drive starts out as completely blank initially, so you would have to initialize the drive. Initializing the drive simply means creating the most primitive metadata structures necessary to organize the drive. Basically what this does is it creates the the structures necessary in the next step, which is to lay down partitions on the drive. This used to be simple at one time, there was only one possible data structure possible on PC's, which was known as the MBR structure (Master Boot Record). The MBR has been the most basic metadata of drives since the days of MS-DOS. However, the MBR has now gotten old and it can't work on drives larger than 2TB, so they created a new more modern metadata structure which they call the GPT (GUID Partition Table), So nowadays you have to choose between the MBR format or the GPT format with drives. https://is.gd/CzZuRa

(3) Partition tables. This is the meta data that allows you to take a single large disk and split it up into multiple subdivisions, for whatever purposes you deem necessary. Most people will likely just put one partition onto the disk, but there are some who need to put more than one. This is the mechanism that allows you to do that.

(4) File system. This is the final piece of metadata that goes onto the disk, and it's the highest piece of metadata. Within each partition, you organize the area into what's called a filesystem. This is how you keep track of files on the disk, including their names, their sizes, their dates of creation, and their access rights. In Windows, you have two choices to put here, including FAT32 and NTFS. In other operating systems, you might have the Ext3FS in Linux, HFS+ in Apple computers, etc.

All of these steps are software steps, quite a bit more complex than the hardware steps which is dead simple comparatively.

Starrysky:
Some operating systems need to have the drive recognized in the System Management or Drive Management window where it can be "mounted" or "made active" and then partitioned (if needed or wanted) and divided into logical drives (if needed or wanted) and formatted if not already formatted.
A guess from only "computer" and no information from you on what type or what operating system.
randike2007:
it is not that hard at all. first power down th epc open it up. then attached the wires. see if ti turns of. an dthen see on the pc if you can sse the new hadr driver.

if you can right click and format the drive. thne you are good to go.

if you cant see it go to computer, right lick and go to manage. under there you will see dis managemnt… play around with these settings. you wll figure it out….

not hard go for it

Laurence I:
it will need partitioning. you do that in Disk Management you get there by right click my_computer and choose MANAGE. once you have partitioned it, you format it. then it appears in my_computer. and Yes it is easy enough. if its a pre-used drive, it may have data on it it already. to remove that simply delete the existing partitions in Disk Management. MAKE SURE THAT IN DISK MANAGEMENT you are looking at the ADDED drive and NOT your system one.
Frostfire:
That's all, there is to it.
Mike G:
No, it isn't. The one thing you didn't mention was the mounting. You need to have an available drive bay in which to mount your drive.

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