Internet through my entire house no reconnecting?

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I have quite a big house with thick walls the rueter does not transmit wireless signal through the entire house. I got one of these mains Internet extender. I can get Internet in the entire house now. But as I move from one part of the house to the other I lose signal for a second while it connect to the other

I have quite a big house with thick walls the rueter does not transmit wireless signal through the entire house. I got one of these mains Internet extender. I can get Internet in the entire house now. But as I move from one part of the house to the other I lose signal for a second while it connect to the other Rueter/extender. Is there any possible way that anyone knows of, to sort this out so it s a continuous Internet signal?

Other answer:

rupert:
You have not indicated whether the two WiFi sources (the router and the Powerline adapter Wireless Access Point) are using the same channel and SSID and encryption; are using different wireless channels; or different SSIDs.

To understand what is happening you need to understand routing in a switch and the basic architecture of the box referred to as a router.

A wireless router box contains three major sub-systems: one, the actual router function that allows communication between different subnets (for home routers these are the private subnet and the Internet/ISP connection); two, a switch function (most home routers have 6 port switch function – one port connects to the router function, normally 4 ports present externally as PC/LAN Ethernet ports; and three the wireless access point function); and finally the wireless access point function providing the routers WiFi network.

When a connection is established to a device on the private network, the switch function 'learns' which of its ports are involved in the connection, and packets are transferred only between those ports. If you have a device connected by WiFi directly to the router, and it switches to a different wireless access point either automatically or under manual command, then the switch in the router has to detect the change of routing so that the packets are transferred through the correct wireless access point. The switch process involves the device configuring itself to work with the new access point's MAC address. Then the switch has to detect that the device has moved to a different port before the switch-over completes. Unfortunately this can take a second or two to complete.

If the WiFi sources are using the same SSID, then a device may spontaneously switch between sources, with the short break of service while the network responds to the change. The switch may not be from a weak signal to a stronger one, but may go the other way. Assessing the signal strength is a bit hit and miss as the access point spends most of its time in receive mode and is not producing a signal for the device to measure.

Unless you can get a sufficiently strong signal to cover the whole house I think you will have to live with the short interruptions. Using different SSIDs means that the switch will occur at times that you decide. This should mean that you can schedule the switch-over so it does not clash seriously with game playing.

I hope this helps.

Taco Dance:
A network in a large location can get a little complicated. You may hire a professional to assist with this but here is what you would want to do.
1st you would want a switch installed where your modem is. Then you want multiple routers. How many is up to you, the more the better. You will run Ethernet through the house to locations you went to setup the routers. (alternative to running cable below) So say you now have cable to your living room, kitchen and betroom. You will place a router at each location.
If you don't want to go through the trouble of running cable you can try using devices called Powerline adapters. These use your home's electrical wiring as ethernet. It isn't as good as ethernet but is often much cheper than running cable.

After you have the routers setup you need to program them in a different way than an average household would have them. Search for "How to Connect Two Routers (with Pictures) – wikiHow" to see a tutorial in setting this up.

Now this is for an ideal situation, best reliability. Modem – switch – ethernet – routers. Followed by Modem – switch – powerline adapters- routers. (Of course there is still lots of ethernet in the mix between things)

Lastly you could just go the easy route and use a bunch of wifi extenders but I don't like even seeing one of them in a house.

deboerdn2000:
like richard says there's no easy way around that. i run a separate router which lets me kind of roam around and its more stable when switching over. so in essence my router is controlling the traffic while my other routers(configured as access points only) run all the wireless in the house. it still takes a few milliseconds to reroute traffic but because its not changing the interface it usually doesnt effect gaming at all. with the commercial systems, all your access points talk to a central controller and that can do it with zero handoff. it will never be seamless at least on a home system.
Aerialnine:
Your hopping though the house…..sorta like the old cell phone system , when you went from cell tower to cell tower stuff happened….
Your going from a wide open hallway , to walking along a wall , back to open hallway…..stuff happens….
Also you could be bouncing between the main wifi unit and the range extender because they maybe overlapping in an area…….
Bill P:
Thick walls, radiators and furniture block the radio signal which is what causes the wi fi to drop out sometimes.

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