I'm frustrated with programming (C++)..?

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I've been programming off and on before I hit college. Now that I'm here I wanted to be a software devolper/engineer. I finished my first semester with c++ and passed fine everything was good. Now I'm on break and I'm trying to teach myself a little bit of next semester's stuff and I found that

I've been programming off and on before I hit college. Now that I'm here I wanted to be a software devolper/engineer. I finished my first semester with c++ and passed fine everything was good. Now I'm on break and I'm trying to teach myself a little bit of next semester's stuff and I found that stuff to be relatively easy on my mind. So I think I'm fine but I've been trying to implement my own programs. For example I wanted to try to make a weather program that fetches weather from the web. Then I was looking for some libraries. It was a ***** trying to download and get the ******* things to work so i quit lol. I looked around and everything was outta date and it was just hell. I cant create anything im just stuck in the basics and cant move forward. Do you think I should just learn another language or get into web devolpment because I just feel like Im running in circles with c++ because in other languages its so much easier. Its not even the language that kills me its how to actually implement something. Its like everyhting is 10 times harder than it would be say python. I was just thinking that maybe i will keep by c++ skills sharp and do problems online like hackerrank and get into web development i figure i can make some money freenlancing in college.

This is probably badly structured but im just so pissed off right now. I'm not usually the one to back down but maybe Ill just see what 2nd semester offers in college as far as programming and see how to continue from the

Other answer:

Case:
If you're working on a computer science degree, be patient. You're one semester in. It will get progressively more challenging.

There's more to being a good developer than learning syntax. In your introductory C++ class, you're learning about different data types, objects, structures, programming techniques. You're learning how to break a big project into smaller pieces, how to design reusable code. It's very possible that in your first "real" job you won't use C++ at all. But you will use the programming concepts that they're teaching in your class. When you're working in a job, you won't always be able to cobble together libraries that others have developed. You'll often have to build your own. That's where your knowledge will become useful.

EddieJ:
You can only find a library if someone has created it. The fact that no one created it has nothing to do with C++.

The problem is your expectations. There is no weather on the web to fetch. When you look at a weather site, you will see characters displayed on the screen. Those may or may not be part of the HTML that the website provides. If the data is there then you can "scrape" it. You can find screen-scraping libraries that know nothing about the weather websites. You, as the programmer, can use the scraping routines as tools but you have to learn how to use them.

Or, you can look for an API (Application Programming Interface) that is provided by a particular weather website, but a particular site doesn't necessarily provide such.

Chris:
I'm not going to touch C++ unless I absolutely have to. I don't need it.

I'm writing my own web and Android apps, and games, and it's actually fun. Creating a weather fetchy thing in JavaScript takes ten minutes.

Switch the language before you become too frustrated, better sooner than later. Go with JavaScript.

Andy T:
C++ lives in the distant past, and it has to. Except that esoteric Microsoft Managed C++ tweak, every new() has to have corresponding delete(). Everything is in archaic form because it has to compile to driver space. Academic entanglement, or involvement with this language is shallow at most for this reason.

Switch language is just good idea, I would not go with Python but there are tons of other options.

V. Perkins:
Gotta learn to walk before you can run.

Take your homework from last semester and update the scenarios to be a bit tougher. Reinforce the concepts you just learned and be ready for the coming semester. This works very well, especially if you're going to have the same profs from last semester.

no1home2day:
Oops – uh – sorry. I must have made a wrong turn somewhere. I was looking for Yahoo Answers; I didn’t realize this was your personal blog. I’ll just leave the way I came in.
PurpleVeridia:
I think you should go with an easier language. Why make it harder on yourself.

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