Correct placing of Wifi Routers inside the house ?

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I have 3 stories House. Construction is of concrete, cement, etc.
In the center of the house, is running our main power cable vertically, connecting to independent DBs ( Distribution Boxes ) on each floor.
If I place my wifi routers on each floor, next to the DB, then do you think there be interference in Wifi

I have 3 stories House. Construction is of concrete, cement, etc.
In the center of the house, is running our main power cable vertically, connecting to independent DBs ( Distribution Boxes ) on each floor.
If I place my wifi routers on each floor, next to the DB, then do you think there be interference in Wifi Signals ? If yes, then what is recommended distance / gap between Electric DB, and a Wifi Router ?

Further, I plan that I be connecting the 3 routers on 3 floors, through LAN cable, instead of wireless. Is this good solution ?

Best Answer:

Andrep: Some questions for you:

Do you have more than one ISP connection? I suspect the answer is NO.

Are you aiming to have three separate subnets with one on each floor? If so, do you want the subnets isolated from each other? If the answer to both is YES, then you need a fourth router (non-wireless), which will connect to the ISP and connect by Ethernet to each of the other three routers. All four routers will be on different subnets. The three wireless routers will all need Ethernet WAN/Internet ports to connect back to the router connected to the ISP.

If you do not want the subnets isolated, then one of the three can connect to the ISP, and the other two are not used as routers, but as Ethernet switches and combined wireless access points. These last two must not offer a DHCP service, and their ISP ports are unused. In this scenario, if you only have a single electricity meter, you might do better with Powerline adapters such as:

http://www.tp-link.us/products/details/?…

You can add an extra adapter similar to the larger one. This will give you Ethernet and the primary WiFi network from the router, and Ethernet and secondary WiFi networks from the Powerline adapters. (The smaller adapter connects to the router and does not need WiFi as the router is already providing it.) With a Powerline network, you can go up to around 6 or 7 adapters in the whole network. Personally, I run adapters as different WiFi networks with different WiFi names so I know which WiFi source I am using.

Ideally, WiFi sources should be away from any metal trunking and large metal objects, so don't hide one behind the 'fridge'.

Ethernet is nearly always a better connection than WiFi. Ethernet ports on a router work in parallel with each other and are full-duplex. WiFi is shared by all devices connected to it and is half duplex.

I hope this helps.

Other answer:

Andrep:
My router is sitting inches away from my electrical "breaker box", no issues.
Elliot:
first

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